Collection Of Various Shorthanded Limit Hold’em Articles & Posts

$20.00 $7.00
Quantity:

in stock

Collection Of Various Shorthanded Limit Hold’em Articles & Posts

“Vary your play.” Those three words are like a sacred mantra, chanted down by more authors than I care to visualize. Those three words are treated as gospel by thousands of poker players every day. Because it is said so often and practiced even more, the sanctity of the advice often goes unquestioned. But is it really such a sacred concept after all?

DMCA.com

Collection Of Various Shorthanded Limit Hold’em Articles & Posts

“Vary your play.” Those three words are like a sacred mantra, chanted down by more authors than I care to visualize. Those three words are treated as gospel by thousands of poker players every day. Because it is said so often and practiced even more, the sanctity of the advice often goes unquestioned. But is it really such a sacred concept after all?

The Losing Psychology

Why do losing players continue to lose? There are only a handful of plausible explanations. Maybe the losing player doesn’t care about winning, or they aren’t willing to put in the time to learn, or they don’t know where to learn. Maybe the losing player fails to observe others, lacks necessary patience, or simply tilts at the first sign of bad luck. To each of these players, the instruction “Vary your play” must sound wonderful. After all, it’s a simple concept and easy to implement. It requires little patience, since one can play extra hands in the name of ‘variety.’ It justifies tilting, explaining those bad raises or calls away. “In any case”, the tilter thinks, “I’m just mixing up my play.” It is some of the most undemanding advice available in the poker world, because everybody can be “unpredictable,” and they don’t even really need to know how to play.

There have been multiple networks showing celebrities compete in poker tournaments for their favorite charities. An education in solid poker play this is not, but there is some entertainment value, especially if you enjoy poker for the sake of poker. When they were asked about their style, many of the celebrities stated something to the effect of, “Well, I have no clue what I’m doing, so that will make me really unpredictable. I figure that’s a huge advantage.” Of course, this sort of logic is flawed (and humorous). But it does give an introspective look into the thought process of many beginning players who feel that “unpredictability” is a “huge advantage.”

In this article, we will somewhat debunk the “Vary your play” motto. I will argue that it is an idea that only applies intermittently to specific sets of players. In effect, we will change the slogan to “Vary your play IF…” Figuring out when to vary your play will separate the losing players using unpredictability as an excuse from the winning players using unpredictability as a weapon.

Reflecting the Wrong Image

Let’s begin with the fundamental assumption that there is a ‘correct’ way to play. I believe strongly that there is in fact a correct style, and that style is known as tight/aggressive. In order to be tight and aggressive, a winning player will naturally play tighter than most of their competition, and a winning player will bet, raise, or reraise more effectively than their competition. In addition, the tight/aggressive player will regularly show down winning hands. There is nothing a winning player can do to change these simple truths. And eventually, somebody will notice. But the reality is that most players will in fact never notice. There are several reasons the tight/aggressive player escapes detection.

First, most players are unobservant. Online opponents might play 2 or more tables, read their email, visit their favorite website, or watch TV in the background. There is also a high turnover on most online games, with players changing tables or limits at a whim. Some players show up to play as little as ten minutes before work, errands, or the new episode of their favorite sitcom. Even at live games, most players only notice hands shown down at the end, and even then they might not pay heed unless they were the one losing the pot. Since most pots are won by a high-quality hand, it may not even register as unusual when one player consistently shows down good hands to take down large pots. In fact, such a trend might be taken as evidence of that player’s good fortune. Note: You could encourage this point of view by occasionally ‘admitting’ that the deck is “running your over.”

Second, luck will play a role in mixing up one’s play. No matter how tight one plays, they will occasionally get streaks of five or more hands where they start with premium holdings. Raising the pot several times in a row could brand a player as loose/aggressive, because few players would suspect that all those consecutive hands were in fact properly played.

Finally, we come to the other underlying problem with loose calls or raises. To affect your image, you must show down your hand. Consider how often a hand like 96s misses the flop. Is it worth “advertising” your phantom loose tendencies if you must make several bad plays to show your hand? Remember, if you consistently take hands too far and bluff too much in the name of “unpredictability”, you are no longer playing tight/aggressive. While trying to deceive people into believing you are a loose/aggressive or loose/passive player, you may in fact become one! Even when you finally show down a poor hand, your opponents must notice your play and make a change in how they play against you. Also, if they reason deeply enough to consider that you might play an extra hand to “vary your play,” you have lost all advantage. In other words, a player good enough to pay attention could very well be good enough to see through your ruse. A player not good enough to see through your deception may not notice your ‘bad play’ in the first place.

Buy this eBook and write a review, and get a $7 coupon




Submit your review
* Required Field


All Ebooks, Gambling, Games, Resell Rights

Comments are closed.

Related Products